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Resource Type: Report

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A Review of New Jersey Water Bank Financing for Green Infrastructure Projects

This report issued by New Jersey Future, A Review of New Jersey Water Bank Financing for Green Infrastructure Projects, is the culmination of a year-long partnership with I-Bank and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection to improve access to the program’s low-cost green infrastructure financing and continues to move the I-Bank into innovative areas of lending beyond traditional “gray” infrastructure.

Read more about the project here.

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Informing, Improving, and Expanding Water Quality and Financing through Advanced Data Management

Informing, Improving, and Expanding Water Quality and Financing through Advanced Data Management

Over the past three decades, billions of federal, state, and local dollars have been deployed to support water infrastructure projects and other programs that reduce point and nonpoint sources of pollution to the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.

The University of Maryland Environmental Finance Center examined the trends that emerged in terms of project characteristics that drive successful outcomes and identified gaps in how funders collect evaluation data. After analyzing 699 projects across two major Bay-wide funders, the EFC provided recommendations for improving the impact of grant-funded programs and projects. Specifically, the EFC recommended that funders establish a process to better coordinate data collection efforts in order to assess and improve future program evaluation and regional investment. The complete findings and recommendations are detailed in the report.

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Putting children first: Tackling lead in water in child care facilities

Addressing lead in water in child care facilities presents a significant opportunity to reduce lead exposure for many vulnerable children in a single location, with reasonable effort. To succeed in testing and remediating lead in water, child care facility operators, state licensing agencies, and health departments will need support from EPA, water utilities, and NSF International, as well as the families they serve.

This report, Putting children first: Tackling lead in water in child care facilities, provides recommendations for each of these critical audiences.

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Advancing One Water Through Arts and Culture: A Blueprint for Action

This report, Advancing One Water Through Arts and Culture, aims to help water leaders envision the various ways that arts and culture can advance One Water goals, and how they can most effectively partner with artists and cultural leaders. It catalogues more than 30 real-world examples of effective projects and artistic collaborations, complete with in-depth case studies.

The blueprint presents a framework that can demonstrate the myriad ways in which arts and culture strategies can be effective, focused on seven strategies for how arts and culture can:

  1. Help people understand and connect to water;
  2. Inform water resource planning with new perspectives;
  3. Engage communities in participatory processes;
  4. Build bridges across different sectors and stakeholder groups;
  5. Mitigate the disruptive effect of construction projects;
  6. Integrate water infrastructure into the fabric of a community; and
  7. Support community activism.

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Mainstreaming Potable Water Reuse in the United States: Strategies for Leveling the Playing Field

This report, Mainstreaming Potable Water Reuse in the United States: Strategies for Leveling the Playing Field, is intended to inform the broader dialogue about water reuse through a specific focus on potable reuse. The goals are to help municipalities and utilities that are considering potable reuse develop their approach and to help advance the efforts of those who are ready to implement projects.

 

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Working with the Market: Economic Instruments to Support Investment in Green Stormwater Infrastructure

This report, Working with the Market: Economic Instruments to Support Investment in Green Stormwater Infrastructure, will help stormwater program managers leverage market forces to drive implementation and investment in green infrastructure that meets their needs. Over the next 20 years, communities across the U.S. are likely to invest upwards of $150 billion to manage stormwater infrastructure and the associated impacts on water quality, hydrology, and health.  It was developed as a product of the 2016 fall dialogue hosted by the National Network on Water Quality Trading, written in partnership with Storm & Stream Solutions LLC, and with collaboration from WEF’s Stormwater Institute.

Working with the Market: Economic Instruments to Support Investment in Green Stormwater Infrastructure. Read the full report or the summary handout.

 

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Making the Utility Case for Onsite Non-potable Water Systems

 The National Blue Ribbon Commission developed this report, Making the Utility Case for Onsite Non-potable Water Systems, to help water and wastewater utilities, local government agencies, and other interested stakeholders understand the benefits and drivers behind onsite non-potable reuse, how other utilities have addressed potential challenges, and best practices for the ongoing operation of these systems.

Onsite non-potable water system: A system in which water from local sources is collected, treated, and used for non-potable uses at the building to district/neighborhood scale, generally at a location near the point of generation.

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Making It Rain: Effective Stormwater Fees Can Create Jobs, Build Infrastructure, And Drive Investment In Local Communities

This issue brief, Making It Rain: Effective Stormwater Fees Can Create Jobs, Build Infrastructure, and Drive Investment in Local Communities, produced by Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) explains how a stormwater fee can provide a steady stream of funding for stormwater management. NRDC presents a suite of strategic recommendations for local governments in the process of initiating stormwater fees and accompanying programs. These recommendations position stormwater management as an opportunity to fund and build infrastructure, fairly apportion costs, create jobs, and invest in improvements to communities.

NRDC argues that an impervious area–based stormwater fee can help attribute costs in proportion to how much stormwater runoff a property generates. NRDC also references real-world examples from around the country, with a special focus on the Chesapeake Bay watershed—a region where stormwater fee programs are relatively common.

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New Jersey Lead Poisoning Prevention Action Plan

The analysis and recommendations contained in the 2018 New Jersey Lead Poisoning Prevention Action Plan provide a comprehensive framework for action steps that can be undertaken by the state, local agencies and other prevention partners to fully eliminate childhood lead poisoning within ten years in New Jersey.

These strategies focus on the causal sources of environmental lead exposure, support improvements to services to mitigate the impact of lead exposure in at-risk communities, including communities of color, and suggest investment in targeted, data-driven primary prevention efforts. Key policy reforms and investment in infrastructure would increase the safety of the environment, and risk-based prevention activities would prevent lead poisoning for New Jersey’s most vulnerable children.

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Water Needs through 2040 for New Jersey Public Community Water Supply Systems

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) contracted with Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey  to estimate water demands in New Jersey for each Public Community Water Supply system to the year 2040. The project results will support future water supply planning by NJDEP, including the Statewide Water Supply Plan. This project made several important advances regarding our understanding of water supply demands and demand forecasting.

This report provides a detailed technical discussion of the methodology, data collection, data analyses, model development and assumptions, and results for the project. It is not written or intended for general public use.

 

 

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