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Results from 2019 Value of Water Index: American Support for Investments in Water Infrastructure

Results from 2019 Value of Water Index: American Support for Investments in Water Infrastructure shows massive bipartisan support for investing in water infrastructure. One-pager with results here.

Over the past four years, the Value of Water Campaign has polled American voters to better understand their opinions about the state of our nation’s water infrastructure and what they view as priorities for action and potential solutions. The fourth annual national poll of over 1,000 American voters, was conducted by the bipartisan research team of Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz, and Associates (D) and New Bridge Strategy (R).

Key poll findings include:
  • Americans support rebuilding our nation’s infrastructure more than any other issue facing the current administration, including building a border wall, repealing or replacing Obamacare, providing permanent status for Dreamers, or increasing military defense spending. Over three-fourths of voters (79 percent) say rebuilding America’s infrastructure is extremely or very important.
  • More than two-thirds of Americans (68 percent) support investment in water infrastructure at the national, state, and local levels — even when told that investment carries a $1.2 trillion price tag. Also, two-thirds of voters support a proactive program of water infrastructure upgrades, rather than fixing problems as they arise (67 percent).
  • Four in five (80 percent) American voters say what they pay for water service is affordable, and more than three in five voters would be willing to pay a modest increase in local water rates to fund improved service.
  • No other issue has nearly as much broad and bipartisan support. Support for investing in water infrastructure cuts across age, gender, party, geography, and ideology. More than three in four Democrats and Republicans agree rebuilding America’s infrastructure should be a top priority for the President and Congress this year.
  • Water quality concerns emphasizes need for investment and innovation. Seventy-four percent of Americans — living in both urban and rural areas — are concerned about contaminants affecting their water quality. More than five in eight Americans support local water agencies increasing the use of potable recycled water in their community.

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Fact Sheet: Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS)

This fact sheet, Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS), provides an introduction to PFAS chemicals, their uses, potential risks, major sources in the environment, occurrence in New Jersey’s public water systems, regulatory developments, remediation information, and links to additional resources. It was published in March 2019.

To educate stakeholders on problems and solutions and to empower stakeholders in the planning and management of their water infrastructure, Louis Berger, a member of Jersey Water Works, has developed this fact sheet on per- and polyfluroalkyl substances (PFAS), contaminants of emerging concern. The Jersey Water Works Education and Outreach committee and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) also played important roles in the development of this resource.

Fact Sheet: Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS)

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Basic Water Utility Management: A Guide for Local Leaders

This brief, Basic Water Utility Management: A Guide for Local Leaders, presents tools to help mayors understand their water systems and utilities better.

Cities are better off with strong water systems, but these take time, investment, and political will to build and maintain. Many cities are facing aging infrastructure, water quality challenges, combined sewer overflows, and more. These things impact the quality of life of everyone within the city. It is important for mayors to understand the different ways water intersect with their city. Part of a mayor’s job is to understand vital operations of a city—at least in overview. Water utilities and infrastructure are a part of that.

Basic Water Utility Management: A Guide for Local Leaders

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Funding Land Conservation Projects with the Clean Water State Revolving Fund

This fact sheet, Funding Land Conservation Projects with the Clean Water State Revolving Fund, describes opportunities to fund land conservation with the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF). The CWSRF can provide assistance for projects that result in the protection or restoration of surface water, which can include the purchase of land, leasing, fee-simple purchase, and easement. This fact sheet demonstrates how the CWSRF provides assistance to eligible recipients for projects promoting land conservation and restoration and highlights successful projects in California, Georgia, and Ohio.

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Impact of Proper Maintenance of Combined Sewer Overflow System on Flooding in the City of Camden

This fact sheet was prepared by the Jersey Water Works Best Practices Committee. It summarizes a case study performed by CDM Smith, an engineering firm, and commissioned by the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority. The Impact of Proper Maintenance of Combined Sewer Overflow System on Flooding in the City of Camden was predicted by modeling Camden’s combined sewer system (CSS) and measuring the changes in the volume of stormwater conveyed to water pollution control facilities (WPCFs), combined-sewer overflows (CSOs), and flooding in the City​ ​of​ ​Camden​ ​as​ ​a​ ​result​ ​of​ ​cleaning​ ​pipelines​ ​and​ ​removing​ ​build-ups​ ​of​ ​silt​ ​and​ ​debris.

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How Technology Is Providing Solutions For Clean Water

This resource from Ohio University highlights pollution prevention efforts and technologies engineers are focusing on to improve the safety of drinking water. It contains infographics for innovative technologies including desalinization, irrigation, and wastewater treatment. It is intended to create awareness around the need for these improving technologies to create safer and more sustainable water infrastructures for generations to come. 

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U.S. GAO Recommendations to Enhance EPA’s Oversight of Lead Rule

GAO makes three recommendations, as part of its report, Additional Data and Statistical Analysis May Enhance EPA’s Oversight of the Lead and Copper Rule, including for EPA to require states to report data on lead pipes and develop a statistical analysis on the likelihood of LCR violations to supplement its current oversight. EPA agreed with GAO’s recommendations.

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Stormwater Management Toolkit from America’s Rivers

American Rivers has tools available to help public utility managers communicate about stormwater management and assist them in fostering public support for collecting fees to upgrade and/or maintain water infrastructure.

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