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Other Best Practices

Upgrading New Jersey’s urban water systems requires efforts across many fronts. While green and gray infrastructure, community engagement and financing are all key components, there will be many other areas in which Jersey Water Works, local officials, utility executives and community members will be involved. Below are documents and links to best practices in many of those areas.

Resources

Water Needs through 2040 for New Jersey Public Community Water Supply Systems

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) contracted with Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey  to estimate water demands in New Jersey for each Public Community Water Supply system to the year 2040. The project results will support future water supply planning by NJDEP, including the Statewide Water Supply Plan. This project made several important advances regarding our understanding of water supply demands and demand forecasting.

This report provides a detailed technical discussion of the methodology, data collection, data analyses, model development and assumptions, and results for the project. It is not written or intended for general public use.

 

 

Joint Legislative Task Force on Drinking Water Infrastructure’s Final Report

The Joint Legislative Task Force on Drinking Water Infrastructure convened on Jan. 8 and voted unanimously to adopt the findings and recommendations in its report.

In response to concerns over the condition of the State’s drinking water infrastructure, on Jun. 30, 2016 the Legislature passed Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 86 and Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 161, establishing the Joint Legislative Task Force on Drinking Water Infrastructure. The task force was charged with studying and making recommendations concerning issues related to drinking water infrastructure in New Jersey, and identifying both short-term and long-term solutions to address the quality and condition of drinking water infrastructure in the State. Read the Joint Legislative Task Force on Drinking Water Infrastructure’s final report.

Pursuant to these resolutions, the task force held three public hearings at the State House Annex in Trenton, New Jersey on Nov. 30, 2016, Dec. 14, 2016, and Jan. 26, 2017. At the first two hearings, the task force took testimony from invited guests on the current condition of the State’s drinking water infrastructure, what improvements are necessary to ensure a safe and adequate drinking water supply, and potential funding mechanisms for those improvements. At the third hearing, the task force took testimony from invited guests and members of the public on the issue of lead in drinking water. Transcripts for these hearings, including written testimony submitted by witnesses, are available on the Legislature’s website.

During its deliberations, the task force took testimony from a wide variety of government agencies, stakeholders, and experts in the field of water infrastructure, as well as members of the public. Over two dozen witnesses testified before the task force, including representatives from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), the New Jersey  Environmental Infrastructure Trust (NJEIT), the New Jersey Department of Education (DOE), and the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (BPU); investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities, and utilities authorities; nonprofit scientific and educational organizations; environmental advocacy groups; and the academic community. The input the task force received from witnesses serves as the basis for the findings and recommendations in this report.

Our Water Transformed: An Action Agenda for New Jersey’s Water Infrastructure

The report, Our Water Transformed: An Action Agenda for New Jersey’s Water Infrastructure, offers an in-depth understanding of the state’s water infrastructure and the context for improvement, provides clarity on how Jersey Water Works has brought so many stakeholders together to affect change, and outlines a consensus-based “action agenda” with three practical solutions:

  • Robust asset management to enable water utilities to deliver the optimum level of service with the most community benefits at the lowest lifecycle cost.
  • Educated stakeholders so that ratepayers and rate setters, consumers and policymakers can understand the value of investing in water infrastructure and the peril of deferring maintenance.
  • Government funding initiatives to provide loans and grants to help implement asset management and upgrade systems.

Download the full report.

New Jersey Water Supply Plan 2017-2022

The 2017-2022 New Jersey State Water Supply Plan constitutes the second complete revision of the plan. The goal of this document is to form the foundation of a “living” resource able to be updated on a continuous basis as reliable new data becomes available and improved upon as new scientific methods are identified. This updated Plan and the evolving planning process it initiates, will serve as a tool to help the management, regulation, conservation, and development of the State’s water resources for the foreseeable future.

How Technology Is Providing Solutions For Clean Water

This resource from Ohio University highlights pollution prevention efforts and technologies engineers are focusing on to improve the safety of drinking water. It contains infographics for innovative technologies including desalinization, irrigation, and wastewater treatment. It is intended to create awareness around the need for these improving technologies to create safer and more sustainable water infrastructures for generations to come. 

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