Browse By

Resources

Resource Type: Best Practice Guide    Topic: Empowered Stakeholders

Drinking Water Guide: A Resource for Advocates

The River Network's Drinking Water Guide Cover Page Photo

The River Network’s Drinking Water Guide is a first step in galvanizing a national network of advocates for safe, clean, affordable, and sustainable drinking water and drinking water systems. River Network hopes that the guide will serve as a key resource for groups and individuals working on these issues to better understand, integrate, and elevate issues of equity and justice as part of their drinking water advocacy.

River Network Drinking Water Guide

Resource Type: White Paper    Topic: Effective and Financially Sustainable Systems

Water Resources Baseline Topic Report

This report examines water resource and infrastructure issues in northern New Jersey, reports on current and possible future conditions, and recommends water resource objectives, outcomes, metrics and indicators for use by the Together North Jersey in its Regional Plan for Sustainable Development (RPSD). For each element of water sustainability, the report addresses whether sustainability is being achieved under current conditions and demands, and whether capacity exists for increased future demands.

Water Resources Baseline Topic Report

Resource Type: Best Practice Guide    Topic: Other Best Practices

Jersey Water Works Strategic Communications Recommendations and Message Platform

Jersey Water Works now has its own messaging guide on how to effectively communicate about water. This guide has tips on developing a strong message to engage individuals on the current state of our water infrastructure and the solutions JWW is working towards. Learn how to connect with your audience by starting with why everyone should care about the challenges we face in the water sector.

Jersey Water Works Strategic Communications Recommendations and Message Platform

Resource Type: White Paper    Topic: Lead in Drinking Water

Developing Lead Service Line Inventories Presented by the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators

Many state drinking water administrators are considering developing inventories of the materials used in service lines that are part of the distribution systems of community water systems (CWSs) they regulate. Some states have already conducted voluntary or mandatory surveys of CWSs whether on their own or in response to state legislation. Others are preparing to use the information in the next round of Drinking Water Infrastructure Needs Survey and Assessments (DWINSA) that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing pursuant to Section 2015 of the America’s Water Infrastructure Act of 2018. The 2020 DWINSA will include an estimate of the number of public and private lead service lines as well as an estimate of the costs to replace all lead service lines, which will be a significant undertaking for water systems to develop and states to collect information on. To assist states that are considering initiating a lead service line (LSL) inventory, the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators (ASDWA) has developed the following guidance based on the experience of the states that have already conducted or are preparing to develop a comprehensive inventory of service line materials.

Developing Lead Service Line Inventories Presented by the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators

Resource Type: Handout    Topic: Empowered Stakeholders

Handout: Water Infrastructure Drives New Jersey’s Economy

In order to lay the groundwork for wide-scale transformation of New Jersey’s water infrastructure systems, members of the Jersey Water Works collaborative have prioritized educating the public and elected and appointed officials on the importance of taking care of water infrastructure. This booklet is a tool for doing so and Jersey Water Works encourages all to make this economic case to their local and state elected and appointed officials today.

Water Infrastructure Drives New Jersey’s Economy

Resource Type: Report    Topic: Lead in Drinking Water

Assessment of Eliminating Lead in Minnesota Drinking Water

 The 2017 Minnesota Legislature directed the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) to “conduct an analysis to determine the scope of the lead problem in Minnesota’s water and the cost to eliminate lead exposure in drinking water.” In this report, Assessment of Eliminating Lead in Minnesota Drinking Water, MDH assesses the scope of the lead problem by examining the extent of lead already in water systems as well as factors that allow lead to get in drinking water. However, because drinking water systems across the state are diverse and have varying requirements and resource needs, broad estimates are used to gauge costs.

Lead in Minnesota Water: Assessment of Eliminating Lead in Minnesota Drinking Water

Resource Type: Report    Topic: Effective and Financially Sustainable Systems

Policy Options: Promoting Affordability of Public Water and Sewer Service for Low-Income Households in New Jersey

This discussion paper presents policy options for improving affordability of water and wastewater service for lower income residents in New Jersey—for the benefit not only of those customers, but of all New Jerseyans who depend on their local utilities for clean, safe, and reliable water and sewer service. Jersey Water Works aims to use it to spark discussion among state and local policy makers, utility managers, water and sewer customers, community organizations, and other public sector, private sector, and non-profit stakeholders, and to use it as a basis for further analysis and development of priority recommendations. The paper is based on a review of existing literature from around the country; research on existing New Jersey laws and programs; and interviews with leaders representing or associated with a wide range of stakeholders, including publicly and privately owned utilities, state regulators, affordable housing developers and advocates, consumer advocates, environmental justice advocates, business, and labor.

Promoting Affordability of Public Water and Sewer Service for Low-Income Households in New Jersey: Policy Options

“A major deterrent to proper investment in water infrastructure is affordability . . . Municipalities with a larger share of low-income residents find it difficult to raise rates to fund water infrastructure upgrades due to the detrimental effect higher rates will have on those residents. The result is underinvestment, which is a losing proposition . . . However, while increasing rates can adversely affect low-income households, as several witnesses noted, these effects are not inevitable and can be avoided . . .” —New Jersey Legislature, Joint Legislative Task Force on Drinking Water Infrastructure, Final Report (Jan. 2018)

Resource Type: Report    Topic: Lead in Drinking Water

Rates could fund lead pipe replacement in critical states: Laws in states with the most lead service lines support the practice

In Rates could fund lead pipe replacement in critical states, Emmett Environmental Law & Policy Clinic at Harvard Law School and Environmental Defense Fund reviewed state laws and policies in 13 states with the most lead service lines (LSLs), and found no explicit barriers to using rate funds to replace the lines on private property. These states have an estimated 4.2 million LSLs, more than two-thirds of the nation’s total. In these states, publicly-owned utilities can act pursuant to existing state legislation by determining that the practice serves a public purpose—protecting public health. Investor-owned utilities can do the same, but typically need approval of the state’s utility commission. While we have not reviewed the remaining states, we anticipate that the state laws and policies are similar to the ones we evaluated.

Rates could fund lead pipe replacement in critical states: Laws in states with the most lead service lines support the practice

Resource Type: Best Practice Guide    Topic: Empowered Stakeholders

State Policymakers’ Toolkit

To spotlight the important role that state governments can play in advancing sustainable water management, US Water Alliance and the Council of State Governments developed this State Policymaker’s Toolkit as a resource for elected officials and staff in the executive and legislative branches of state government. For each of the Seven Big Ideas (below), they briefly summarize the key issues and then provide real world examples of how states are forging progress. The promising examples are not meant to be prescriptive, but rather serve as a starting place for the generation of potential solutions that are specific to individual state contexts. For research purposes, these examples include endnote citations back to the legislative or regulatory language that was passed and/or implemented.

Seven Big Ideas:

  1. Advance regional collaboration on water management
  2. Accelerate agriculture-utility partnerships to improve water quality
  3. Sustain adequate funding for water infrastructure
  4. Blend public and private expertise and investment to address water infrastructure needs
  5. Redefine affordability for the 21st century
  6. Reduce lead risks, and embrace the mission of protecting public health
  7. Accelerate technology adoption to build efficiency and improve water service

Resource Type:    Topic: Empowered Stakeholders

Fact Sheet for Press Kits: New Jersey Water Infrastructure

To support media coverage of New Jersey’s water infrastructure issues, this fact sheet for press kits offers background information on water infrastructure in the state. It is a product of the Jersey Water Works Education and Outreach Committee whose goal is to promote well-informed decision makers, community partners, residents and ratepayers and their active participation and influence in the planning and management of their water infrastructure.

Fact Sheet for Press Kits: New Jersey Water Infrastructure

share

SIGN UP FOR UPDATES

Sign up to receive a monthly newsletter with updates on the collaborative’s efforts to upgrade New Jersey’s inadequate water infrastructure.

Sign Up Now