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Financially Sustainable Systems

The water infrastructure most in need of upgrading happens to be in New Jersey’s oldest cities — which are in many cases the most distressed places in the state. They have high rates of poverty and disinvestment, meaning the resources available to pay for these upgrades are extremely limited.

But even in New Jersey’s suburbs, the pipes that carry drinking water and collect sewage and stormwater are aging and in need of costly upgrades and repair. Too often, out of sight has meant out of mind when it comes to maintenance.

Jersey Water Works is helping to identify practical and innovative financing practices to help these places complete the necessary upgrades. Upgraded water systems provide a basis for greater economic growth, so the financing mechanisms represent an investment in our cities’ future.

Resources

Best Management Practices Plan for the Operation and Maintenance of the Combined Sewer, Separate Sanitary Sewer and Separate Stormwater Systems

This document presents industry-accepted standards that a well-run utility uses to operate and maintain its combined sewer system, separate sanitary sewer system, and separate stormwater system. Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority. 2014.

Water Infrastructure in New Jersey’s CSO Cities: Elevating the Importance of Upgrading New Jersey’s Urban Water Systems

This report describes the new regulatory requirement facing the 21 New Jersey municipalities that have combined sewer systems, the characteristics of those cities and their combined sewer systems in particular, and the challenges they face in upgrading the systems. Prepared by Daniel Van Abs, PhD., for New Jersey Future. 2014.

Roxanne Qualls presentation on Cincinnati’s Water Infrastructure

This powerpoint by Roxanne Qualls, former mayor of Cincinnati, describes metropolitan Cincinnati’s holistic approach to drinking water, wastewater and stormwater including its successful programs to resolve combined sewer overflows. 2014.

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